Instruments names

bamboo chamber flutebamboo flutesbansuribasin drumbilma clapsticksbolivian wood flute
bolonborder pipesbulbultarangcajonchromatic harmonicacircle fluteclarinetclassical flute
congascurved soprano saxdafdarbukadidgeridoodjembeduduk from armenia
indian double chamber flutekaenkalimba mbirakavalkoralauneddasmelodicamezoued
ocarinaorganpipesovertone flutepanfluterecordersantoorsaw.uscottish tin whistles
straight soprano saxsuling indonesian flutestalking drumtambourinetenor saxophone
udu drumzither

Didgeridoo (Indig. Australia)

The didgeridoo (or didjeridu) is a unique wind instrument of the Indigenous Australians of northern Australia. It is sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or "drone pipe". Musicologists classify it as an aerophone.
A didgeridoo is usually cylindrical or conical in shape and can measure anywhere from 1 to 2 metres with most instruments measuring around 1.5 metres. Instruments shorter or longer than this are less common. Generally, the longer the instrument, the lower the pitch or key of the instrument. Keys from D to F are the preferred pitch of traditional Aboriginal players.
There are no reliable sources stating the didgeridoo's exact age, though it is commonly claimed to be the world's oldest wind instrument. Archaeological studies of rock art in northern Australia suggests that the Aboriginal people of the Kakadu region of the Northern Territory have been using the didgeridoo for about 1500 years, based on the dating of paintings on cave walls and shelters from this period.

Didgeridoo


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